Raymond G. Perelman Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics

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Discovering new gene and cell therapies to better treat and potentially cure debilitating disorders is a driving factor behind the innovative research in the Raymond G. Perelman Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics (CCMT). Established in 2005, the Center is dedicated to understanding, developing, and applying gene and related cell and nucleic acid therapies and the promotion of professional and public education in the field.

The CCMT aims to be in the forefront of pediatric medicine by fostering a multidisciplinary approach to leading edge research endeavors related to gene transfer, gene regulation, gene discovery, cell therapy, experimental models, correction of genetic and acquired diseases and clinical trials. These approaches will lead not only to a variety of applications in the treatment of inherited disorders, but also to the treatment of acquired and complex disorders, including heart disease, infectious diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, blood disorders and cancer. The CCMT has the capability to move basic pre-clinical discoveries rapidly into clinical application.

To support rapid translation from bench to bedside, the CCMT has the resources to manufacture a wide range of viral and non-viral vectors to transfer genes of interest and the capability of separating and manipulating human cells in order for gene therapy trials to be possible. Supporting the Center's efforts are three core units – the Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Core, Clinical Vector Core, and Research Vector Core – all crucial for advancing both basic and translational research in gene and cell therapies. The diverse group of researchers housed in the CCMT includes neuroscientists and hematologists well versed in the latest technologies and positioned at the forefront of cutting edge science.

Leader

Beverly L. Davidson, PhD

Chief Scientific Strategy Officer
Dr. Davidson works to understand the molecular basis of childhood onset neurodegenerative diseases and the development of gene and small molecule therapies for treatment. She also focuses on how noncoding RNAs participate in neural development and neurodegenerative disease processes, and how they can be harnessed for therapies.